GERD Medications

  • Proton pump inhibitors (such as omeprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) are the most effective in reducing gastric acid secretion. These drugs stop acid secretion at the source of acid production, i.e. the proton pump.
  • Gastric H2 receptor blockers (such as ranitidine, famotidine and cimetidine) can reduce gastric secretion of acid. These drugs are less potent than PPI but may be agent of choice in some patients.
  • Antacids before meals or symptomatically after symptoms begin can reduce gastric acidity (increase pH).
  • Alginic acid (Gaviscon) may coat the mucosa as well as increase pH and decrease reflux.
  • Prokinetics strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and speed up gastric emptying. Cisapride, a member of this class, was withdrawn from the market for causing long QT syndrome. Reglan (metoclopramide) is a prokinetic with a better side-effect profile.
  • Sucralfate (Carafate) is also useful as an adjunct in helping to heal and prevent esophageal damage caused by GERD, however it must be taken several times daily and at least two (2) hours apart from meals and medications.
  • Baclofen is an agonist of GABAB receptor. It has also been shown to decrease transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations at a dose of 10mg given four times daily. Reductions in esophageal relaxation clinically reduce episodes of reflux.

Clear Lake Office

Coastal Gastroenterology Associates

1015 Medical Center Blvd
Suite 1300
Webster, TX 77598

Phone: (281) 557-2527

Texas City Office

Coastal Gastroenterology Associates

7111 Medical Center Drive
2nd Floor 
Texas City, TX 77591

(by appointment only)

Baytown Office 1

Coastal Gastroenterology Associates

Jacinto Medical Group
2800 Garth Road
Baytown, TX 77521

(by appointment only)

Baytown Office 2

Coastal Gastroenterology Associates

1113 W Baker Rd.
Baytown, TX 77521

(by appointment only)